Infertility Drugs

Clomid

Clomid (clomiphene citrate) is available in tablet form and has been used since the early 1960's. It functions as an 'anti-oestrogen', making the body think that it is low in oestrogen. This stimulates the woman's pituitary gland to produce FSH hormone (follicle stimulating hormone) which in turn, stimulates the ovaries to produce eggs (follicles). The main side effects of Clomid are headaches, mood swings and hot flushes.

As far as it is known, there are no adverse effects on children born as a result of fertility drugs and there is no evidence of long-term side effects for the mother. As a general rule however, the use of any drugs should be kept to a minimum. Most fertility specialists recommend limiting the use of these drugs to six to twelve months.

FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) & LH (luteinizing hormone)

FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) and LH (luteinizing hormone) are hormones known as gonadotrophins which stimulate the growth of follicles within the ovary. They can only be administered in injection form. The main drugs used are Gonal-F, Menopur and Puregon. FSH/LH injections have minimal side effects.

As far as it is known, there are no adverse effects on children born as a result of fertility drugs and there is no evidence of long-term side effects for the mother. As a general rule however, the use of any drugs should be kept to a minimum. Most fertility specialists recommend limiting the use of these drugs to six to twelve months